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The Day the Laughter Stopped: The True Story of Fatty Arbuckle Book Review Summary

Detailed Plot Synopsis of The Day the Laughter Stopped: The True Story of Fatty Arbuckle

Buster Keaton said that the day the laughter stopped was September 5, 1921 - the day that Virginia Rappe became ill during a party in Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle's suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco. She died four days later as a result of her illness, peritonitis caused by a ruptured bladder. Mr. Arbuckle had nothing to do with Ms. Rappe's illness and death, but he paid with his good name, his career and his happiness nonetheless. He was tried three times, by a politically motivated and extraordinarily underhanded prosecution, and was acquitted with an unprecedented apology signed by every member of the jury. This should have been more than enough to ensure his warm welcome back into film, but nothing of the sort happened. The tragedy of Roscoe Arbuckle is that he was made to be the scapegoat of a Hollywood running scared from public opinion - his guilt or innocence had become irrelevant.

This is the story that David Yallop tells in The Day the Laughter Stopped. Though the book tells the story of Arbuckle's birth, start in show business and his struggle to work after being sacrificed by so-called friends, the focus of this book is on the unfortunate death of Virginia Rappe, and the ham-handed attempt of the prosecutor to wrangle a political future out of the railroading of an innocent man. The problem? The prosecution had no case - its "star" witness, Maude Delmont, was lying from the onset and was easily discredited, and the doctors who examined Ms. Rappe during and after the party, and who conducted the autopsy, clearly indicated that no violence was done to her. The question, of course, is why she didn't receive proper surgical medical care in the first place, but due to the passage of time I suppose that query will forever go unanswered.

When Mr. Yallop began research for this book, all three of Mr. Arbuckle's wives were still living, and were eager to share their stories with him. Even Minta Durfee and Doris Deane, whose marriages with him ended in divorce, remembered him with great love. Indeed, all who were still around to be interviewed by Mr. Yallop had positive and kind things to say about the gentle, generous Roscoe Arbuckle.

This is an indispensable and devastating text in the study of the trial and the nature of Hollywood business practices in the 20's. Simple common sense and a rudimentary review of the facts indicate that Roscoe Arbuckle was completely innocent - this book makes it abundantly clear. It is a shame that Mr. Yallop has not written further titles regarding the silent era - his voice would be more than welcome.
This report prepared by Graceann Maciolek








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Chapter Analysis of The Day the Laughter Stopped: The True Story of Fatty Arbuckle

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Plot & Themes

job/profession:    -   actor/actress Job/profession/poverty story    -   Yes Story of entertainer?    -   Movie Comedy Actor Period of greatest activity?    -   1900+

Subject of Biography

Gender    -   Male Profession/status:    -   actor/actress/producer Ethnicity    -   White Nationality    -   American

Setting

United States    -   Yes The US:    -   California Misc setting    -   Fancy Mansion    -   prison    -   resort/hotel Century:    -   1900-1920's

Writing Style

Book makes you feel?    -   angry Graphic sex in book?    -   Yes What kind of sex:    -   rape/molest    -   impregnation/reproduction    -   descript. of female anat. (the big V) Pictures/Illustrations?    -   A ton 16-20 B&W How much dialogue in bio?    -   significantly more descript than dialog How much of bio focuses on most famous period of life?    -   26-50% of book

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David A. Yallop Books Note: the views expressed here are only those of the reviewer(s).
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