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The Report Card Book Review Summary

Detailed plot synopsis reviews of The Report Card

Fifth grader Nora remembers everything in her life. From an early age, everything was always very easy for her: puzzles, school work... However, Nora does not like to perform or be pushed around. She in no way wants to attract attention to herself. That's why once she got into grade school, she started to think more "normally". The story begins when Nora has just received her first report card of fifth grade. The results: five D's and one C. Her friend Stephen is very simpathetic and confused, especially when Nora tells him she WANTS to get bad grades.

As she suspected, Nora's parents are furious with her grades. However, Nora has different opinions on grades and tests than her family. She thinks they are "based on a bunch of stupid information that anybody with half a brain can memorize". Nora then has to meet with her teachers, parents and school principal to "discuss why she got the grades she did". The reader will then find out Nora had purposely planned to get bad grades. Then, Nora received F's on all of her final tests. It becomes very clear that Nora is not just an average student; she is a genius. And she knows it. The school then decides to perform some "tests" on Nora, but they are not what she expects.
The review of this Book prepared by Kristina Murray








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Chapter Analysis of The Report Card

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Plot & Themes

Tone of book?    -   thoughtful Time/era of story    -   2000+ (Present Day) Kids growing up/acting up?    -   Yes Is this an adult or child's book?    -   Age 11-14 Age group of kid(s) in story:    -   grade school Something wrong upstairs/downstairs?    -   coping with special abilities

Main Character

Gender    -   Female Profession/status:    -   student Age:    -   a kid Ethnicity/Nationality    -   White (American) Unusual characteristics:    -   Genius

Setting

How much descriptions of surroundings?    -   3 () United States    -   Yes

Writing Style

Amount of dialog    -   roughly even amounts of descript and dialog

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Andrew Clements Books Note: the views expressed here are only those of the reviewer(s).
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