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The Two Princes of Calabar: An Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Odyssey Book Review Summary

Detailed plot synopsis reviews of The Two Princes of Calabar: An Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Odyssey

In the lives of two brothers from a slave-trading community on the Bight of Biafra, Randy J. Sparks uncovers a little known episode in the slave trade and traces the trade's social and economic impact throughout the Atlantic. During a disagreement with a nearby rival slave-trading clan in 1767, which was prompted by English slave merchants, the brothers were seized by a ship captain and pressed into slavery. Thus began their seven-year odyssey to return home.

The brothers were enslaved in Dominica and Virginia. They were eventually taken to England where the Methodists took up their cause. Author Sparks discovered this story while reading their letters to Charles Wesley, one of the founders of Methodism. Eventually, they were freed after their case was adjudicated in the English courts. The book does not make clear whether the brothers or their family continued in the slave trade after this ordeal.
The review of this Book prepared by ldpaulson








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Chapter Analysis of The Two Princes of Calabar: An Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Odyssey

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Plot & Themes

Political/social rights fight    -   Yes Plotlet:    -   slavery Period of greatest activity?    -   1600-1899

Subject of Biography

Gender    -   Male Profession/status:    -   Prince/Nobleman/King

Setting

How much descriptions of surroundings?    -   2 () United States    -   Yes The US:    -   Southeast Africa    -   Yes Kind of Africa:    -   Black Africa The Americas (not US):    -   Yes The Americas:    -   The Caribbean Water?    -   Yes Century:    -   18th century

Writing Style

Book makes you feel?    -   thoughtful Pictures/Illustrations?    -   A few 1-5 B&W How much dialogue in bio?    -   significantly more descript than dialog

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Randy J. Sparks Books Note: the views expressed here are only those of the reviewer(s).
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