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Charles Bukowski Message Board


Andrew Black posts on 1/1/2012 Andrew Black has just written a review of Factotum which you can see here
Carissaanne7@yahoo.com posts on 1/1/2012 Carissaanne7@yahoo.com has just written a review of You Get So Alone At Times That It Just Makes Sense which you can see here
Mason S. posts on 1/1/2012 Mason S. has just written a review of Hollywood which you can see here



Mick Lexington posts on 3/27/2011 4:27:02 PM If you’re a fan of Charles Bukowski you may also like Mr. Jack, a novel by Mick Lexington. Monte Schulz, author of This Side of Jordan and Down By The River says; "Mr. Jack is like drinking a cocktail of equal parts Charles Bukowski, Hubert Selby Jr. and Richard Price. It's both fresh and stunning. An incredible blend of the sweet and bitter… order one up for yourself and see what I mean."
Molly Miller posts on 10/23/2010 7:19:39 PM Sonnet Davis, who gave a summary on the book, made several mistakes in her passage, one of which a vital factor of the book. Henry did not save the cat. Nobody could. The chapter where the boys sick their dog on the cat was the part of the work that, for the first time, gives a clear message to the reader. The cat represents Henry. It is young, like Henry, and it has clean, pure white fur(a metaphor for Henry's innocence). Henry's friends corner the young cat and sick their dog on it. Henry soon realizes that the boys are not the only audience. Several adults come to see the show as well. It is implied that the adults are "failures," and they want to see the cat fail, too. See its perfect white fur drenched in blood. Henry wants to save the cat from the dog, but he does not want the dog to hurt him. He hopes that the cat will escape, but he realizes that one of the people watching will catch it again and put it back with the dog. The cat is "facing humanity," just like Henry. Henry can't watch anymore, and walks home, leaving the cat all by itself. When he gets home, his father is waiting with the threat of a beating. This part of the book is not to tell you that Henry is some little kid who gets to be all proud of himself because he rescued some cat. It is to show you why he turns out the way he does at the end, when he is for some reason so determined to not let the bright eyed, friendly little kid win the arcade game. He became exactly what humanity wanted to make him become: cynical and hateful.


Note: the views expressed here are only those of the posters.
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