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Timothy Findley Message Board


Squid posts on 12/3/2009 12:50:39 AM I was hoping someone could help me in determining the themes in The Wars? I know one theme is the loss of innocence and human frality... maybe? I need to relate the themes to part 4 of the novel. Also I was wondering if someone had any interesting thoughts on how Lady Juliet's narration in section 4?? Thanks :-)
Suud posts on 4/27/2008 10:36:20 PM Hi, I really need help with an essay which deals with both the wars, and regeneration. I have to compare and contrast what the two books have to say about reconstructing the lives of the famous versus retelling the stories of the little-known and how these two kinds of historical subject relate to each other or my other topic which is to compare and contrast what both books have to say about imagining history. Imagining history means making up things in history where you do not know what happened. Would be nice if someone could help me with this, my paper is due soon! thanks a lot
N. John posts on 11/14/2007 10:13:37 PM I agree with the person who's name I forget. Can someone please post some chapter summaries on novels done by Timothy Findley? I'm in dire need because I'm supposed to already have read it for my ISU but, other things seem to have gotten in the way.



stud posts on 4/24/2007 9:48:56 PM What a beautiful novel. Unfortunately, I'm still confused about the prologue/climax and Robert's death.
Anonymous posts on 3/22/2007 7:24:58 PM can anyone post a chapter by chapter summary...because there are honestly none on the net...i need it for my isu that is comming up...
Mary Ann posts on 3/9/2007 5:00:42 PM Re: Timothy Findley- The Wars We have a question that we are debating. How does Robert Ross die. The novel states that he dies at 26 years old in 1922 after convalescing in a military hospital. Here is the question: Was he executed? Thoughts?
Cali posts on 12/14/2006 8:12:36 PM These are probably all too late, but I have an exam on this novel tonight and it would probably be good for me to sort it out. Symbols in the book include glass (broken bottles, stained glass window), water (the lapping sound of the water by the pier is referenced many times) and animals (Rowena's rabbits, the horses throughout the reading, and the small animals in cages in the dugout). The glass could symbolize the frailty and fragility of man and life in itself. Taffler breaks bottles with no mercy in the same way he kills without hesitation. The stained glass window adds a touch of civility amongst turmoil, possibly allowing the men to hold onto their sanity. As for the water, (to me at least) it represents peace and comfort, as memories of family vacations are associated with the sounds of the water. The water jug is broken after Robert's witness of Taffler and the Swede because he is now confused and frustrated. It is at this point that Robert truly snaps, and things become so complicated to him. So he holds onto these little things, memories, the unjudgmental love of animals, these things he stores away within him to try and maintain any bit of civility he can. Robert Ross discovers that war does not make men, but destroys them. Near the end of the novel he rationalizes that if an animal had done what Captain Leather did, it would be shot for madness. This constant connection between humans and animals is important to understand the symbolism of the story. Hope I helped some. <3
Louise posts on 11/27/2006 9:15:57 AM Is Robert Ross a hero or a traitor in Timothy findley's eyes?
Jane posts on 11/21/2006 10:23:07 PM Can anyone give me a brief overview of chapters 4 and 5 of The Wars?? I got confused by it.
mila posts on 11/7/2006 9:08:45 PM can any one tell me about the Wars climax, theme, epigraph. i need this elements for my test. i'll realy appreciate it. thank you.
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